Tag Archives: erotic fiction

Sex-Bomb Writer, Angela Tavares, Interviewed at The Round Up Zine

Angela herself.

Angela herself.

Our Angela has been interviewed at roundupzine, where her gorgeous piece “Sunday Night” is published. It’s a great interview that includes Angela’s discovery of erotica when she was a bright young thing, the reasons she writes about sex, and much much more. You can read the whole interview here. And here’s a snippet:

RU: I’m  kind of a fan of Dennis Cooper, who edited the anthology “Userlands: New Fiction Writers from the Blogging Underground” in which your piece “Fast Ones” appears. How did you get involved in that?

AT: Dennis Cooper is one of my favorite writers and one of my biggest inspirations. He taught me what it means to use daring and brave language, to tell stories that can be uncomfortable. And, of course, for these reasons, I visit his website every day. Very long ago, he invited all his blog readers to submit a short story for an anthology he was putting together—specifically to spotlight some of the writers who participated, if I’m not mistaken—and that’s when I sent “Fast Ones.”

RU: You seem to have a propensity towards erotic fiction given your work with Go Deeper Press, amongst other things. What is it about erotic fiction that interests you, and do you remember the first piece of erotic lit you ever read?

AT: It’s sex that interests me, I think. Erotic fiction, yes—that, too, but I love writing the complexities and vulnerabilities of sex, its emotions and manipulations. Strip your characters bare, and see what they got and what they do with it—for me, this is the most fun. Even before I started Go Deeper Press with Lana Fox and began writing erotica, I always seemed to find a way to have my characters get it on.

First piece of erotic lit was something my mother had hidden in her bookcase near her bed. It focused on an escort service. I only snuck tiny reads from it, but it was hot enough that I managed to sneak back in and find it every time she was out of the house. I allowed myself two paragraphs at a time, and then got out of there.

First piece of erotic lit in a non-shame way: 120 Days of Sodom by the Marquis de Sade. [Read the whole interview at RoundUpZine.)

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Our Dark Sides and, on Halloween, Femme Fatale for Free

Download for free this Halloween!

It’s almost Halloween—the one day a year that we all get to expose our shadows and dark sides, all that stuff we hide way deep down inside. We dress as witches and serial killers and vampires. (My apologies to those preparing their angel and fairy godmother costumes.) It’s sad to think we have only one “official” day a year. Imagine the fun we’d have, the understanding and the opportunities to embrace our full elves, if there was, say, a month relegated to exposing what we hide during the other eleven.

At Go Deeper Press, I’d like to think we let the shadow in 24/7. For me, revealing our darkness is what makes erotica transformative and titillating. It’s what makes erotica fun. Actually, Go Deeper Press may be one of the few erotica houses that doesn’t have a list of “No’s” on our submissions guidelines page, such as no underage, no rape, no incest, no animals, no anything that could make someone feel uncomfortable.

We welcome and honor everyone’s views on the “taboo,” of course. There are likely myriad reasons why a reader may not want to read anything from the list above. Then again, there are just as many reasons why a reader would: to explore, to live out a fantasy safely. And who could argue that there should only be specific topics explored in erotic fiction, where fantasies are the feature?

In our short 10 months of existence, Go Deeper Press has published plenty “taboo” content. We were going to push the whole “rebel erotica” tagline, but never followed through, I guess. Oh, let’s push it again! We are rebel erotica. And it’s not like we don’t have any titles to back it up: Zöe More’s “Hunger,” Lana’s Con (Lana’s everything, actually), and plenty of the fantastic short pieces from Shameless Behavior (“Holding” by Laurel Issac comes to mind), Huddle (Theophilia St. Claire’s “Punishment”), and Dirty Little Numbers (trust me—there’s enough here).

And then there’s Femme Fatale, which is likely one of the darkest of our collections, for obvious reasons. Last time I checked, Femme Fatales don’t run around in flower print on their way to church. Femme Fatale features sexy and “shadowy” fiction at its very best, and because Halloween is the day we can let it all out, it’ll be available as a free download all day tomorrow, Thursday, October 31.

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Go On and Celebrate With the “Dirty Little Authors”

This past Wednesday was a big day for Go Deeper Press. Truth be told, Lana and I, and 24 other erotic writers, kinda busted our asses to produce, what I’d consider, an effing hot flash fiction collection. And then October 23rd rolled around, and there it was: Dirty Little Numbers live on the web and available for all. So far, it’s been really well-received, and we couldn’t be prouder.

That said, a buzz this big doesn’t happen without a little help from your friends. The Dirty Little Numbers authors turned out to be a true marketing/promotional force to be dealt with. Check out some of the celebratory posts on the blogs of a number of writers from the Dirty Little Numbers roster, and while you’re there, poke around a bit. These writers are huge on brains and heart.

You know that feeling you get when everyone around you loves a project just as much as you do, and the energy is good and high, and you huddle up to provide encouragement, and when the huddle breaks, you smack everyone on the ass? Well, this past Wednesday, it happened virtually. Okay. Here’s the proof:

RACHEL KRAMER BUSSEL | My Rihanna-Inspired Flash Fiction Story “Teamwork” Out Now in Dirty Little Numbers

“I’d been touting the Go Deeper Press call for submissions for this one in my erotic writing workshops because it’s a challenge and an art to write a full, sexy story in 500 words or less, but it can be done. I’m looking forward to reading all the others, and strongly recommend writing short, either like this, or the 1,200 word limit, such as in my books Gotta Have It and The Big Book of Orgasms. It’s amazing how much you can cut out when you have such a strict word count; it forces you to boil down the essence of what makes your story.” READ MORE

TAMSIN FLOWERS | You Like It Fast? Try Dirty Little Numbers

“It’s out at last! The book with what simply has to be the best cover in erotica this year is finally available to buy—and I couldn’t be more excited by what I’ve discovered between the covers.” READ MORE

ANNABETH LEONG | Dirty Little (Sex-Positive) Numbers

“Just yesterday, I was talking with a friend about the periodic waves of corporate censorship that erotica writers face. My friend commented that comedians facing censorship have the magic word “satire” on their side—and wondered if erotica writers have any similar get-out-of-jail-free card.” READ MORE

(Also see Annabeth’s “Dirty Little Read-Through: The Sexy Eyelashes of ‘Under Captain Jack’ by Kristina Lloyd,” simply because we love all of our activist authors, you do not want to miss this.)

KRISTINA LLOYD | Dirty Little Numbers

“Dirty Little Numbers, an anthology of flash fiction, is out today, 23rd Oct! My story, “Under Captain Jack,” is the opening piece in the book. Kicking off a collection is always a thrill, and being first also means my short short can be read for free on Amazon’s Look Inside Thingy—in less than 2 minutes! (I timed it, and I’m a slow reader.)” READ MORE

GISELLE RENARDE | Dirty Little Numbers

“I’m going to write a review right now. I don’t usually review fiction, but I’m going to do it anyway.” READ MORE

MIA HOPKINS | Release Day for Dirty Little Numbers

“It’s here! It’s here! Flash fiction anthology Dirty Little Numbers from Go Deeper Press was released today. Oh, my gosh. I’m having palpitations.” READ MORE

You can get your copy of Dirty Little Numbers from godeeperpress.com, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble. (Google Play coming soon, once it stops giving me angina attacks.) As always and always, thank you for your support! 

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Sherlock, Seduction, and Free Erotica (Yes, We’re Giving It Away!)

Now tell me. Are you a fan of the BBC’s Sherlock? Well, if you haven’t heard of it, do take a peek at the vid below. Sherlock and Watson have some fabulous erotic tension going on, and Angela and I are all psyched up to watch Season 2. It’s gorgeous stuff!

Well, frankly, yours truly is a big fan of crime fiction, especially when there’s sexual tension. Which brings me to this. Did you know that, on Monday, you can download the first novelette in the Con Series, “You Can Play It Safe When You’re Dead,” absolutely free? Seriously. We are bonkers, god love us, and are charging zero cents for this book. Do take advantage, dear readers.

Coming as a FREE download on Monday July 15th!

Coming as a FREE download on Monday July 15th!

Warning: Strictly adult reading, the Con Series explores sexual rule-breaking among those who already live outside of society’s laws. Here’s the blurb:

Con artists Stelle and Dahlia want one another. But they’re twins, so that’s the end of that. When a mark gets out a gun, however, and tells them to live out their fantasies, boy, do the sparks fly…

Last, but certainly not least, do check out this Bring Back Desire podcast, which features yours truly along with Yolanda Shoshanna, talking about seduction, no less. I had a fabulous time with Ande — she’s truly amazing! Go check out her wonderful Bring Back Desire too.

Thanks for supporting Go Deeper Press. If you’d like to browse our erotic, sex-positive e-books for brain and brawn, you can find our website here.

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Meet Benji Bright, Part 2

Available at queeryoungcowboys.com

Available at queeryoungcowboys.com

Here’s Part 2 of my interview with the amazingly effin’ talented Benji Bright. I bet it killed you, waiting this long! Here’s the thing: If you haven’t screamed, “Oh my God! I love this guy!” you’ll do so now. And here’s a little help on the front end. You can  buy Candid right now right here. Don’t forget to drop by Benji’s blog at www.theeroticledger.com. Tell him Go Deeper Press sent you.

Candid contains 10 fictional interviews with mostly queer men from seriously all different walks of life. How did your “subjects” come to you? I’d imagine it would have been a long process to create each and every one of them, but please tell me I’m wrong if I am. 

Benji: A lot of the subjects from Candid come from my own experiences, anxieties, fantasies, and those of people I’ve known. I’ve referred to the project in the past as a kind of exorcism, as in putting all of the voices in your head on paper. I knew that Candid would be too niche and too short and too personal to be any definitive survey of whom the contemporary gay male is, so I didn’t worry about that. I wrote (what I hoped was) realistic dialogue for people who were already a part of me in some way. So, it was a fairly quick process. All I had to do was figure out who was speaking and let them speak. I did try to balance sex and sentiment so that no particular character came off like agitprop with a ten-inch dick.

I will say that the editing was harder. I read every line of the novella aloud multiple times to see if it held up to a voice, if it had a natural cadence. I don’t know if I was totally successful, but I was impressed when I watched (listened to?) the trailer that Johnny Murdoc made. It sounded like people talking, so I guess I did my job.

I want to ask you about Dennis Cooper’s The Sluts and whether or not it influenced the format of your book. It’s similar, I think, in the way it captures these men in a moment of time, in sort of a “full-confessional” way.

That’s funny, actually. I was going to mention Dennis Cooper in my list of writing heroes, but then I hedged. I’m not sure why. I think, ultimately, that the first work I read by Dennis Cooper (Frisk) and subsequent reads speak to the darkness behind sexual impulses, which my writing largely skirts. I don’t mean to suggest that my writing is uniformly rosy, but maybe it has a few less thorns. I guess I might as well take this opportunity to formally say that Dennis Cooper is one of my writing heroes, whether I write like him or not. His work stays with you, haunts you. That’s a skill (talent?) worthy of praise.

It was refreshing—I think that’s the best word—to find moments of serious fucking introspection on the topic of sex spoken by your characters, especially in a novella that’s focused on the retelling of sexual encounters that’s meant to make your readers want to get off. I’m thinking specifically of lines like these, courtesy of your interviewer in the second interview: “Maybe it helps if you think of sex as a protected space, an area of your life without judgment. That it’s something primal and ancient that you belong to as much as it belongs to you.” From my experience with erotica, this is atypical dialogue, and it’s awesome. How important was it for you to create these men—some of them, anyway—that could emphasize the importance of connected sex (dare I say healing sex?), ones without the typical “smut” or gay-erotic-lit focus of chiseled chin, ripped abs, gaping hole?

I wanted to create something with characters who had concerns. As much as I love sex (and I definitely do), I struggle with aspects of it. Should I be paying more attention? Should I be more vocal about what I like? Is my ass too small? Where should I put my glasses if this guy doesn’t have a nightstand? Why doesn’t this guy have a nightstand? Should you fuck somebody who doesn’t have a nightstand?

I wanted to write characters who had issues. The idea of connected sex was one of them. There’s the importance of being present during sex, but there’s also another character who totally rejects that notion and equates being mentally elsewhere during sex to channel-surfing or tuning into a different wavelength. There’s a married character who has a dynamic relationship with his partner and others who decry the entire institution.

I absolutely needed my characters to be able to talk about these things. I settled on the title Candid because I wanted to say some real things. Sprinkle a little deeper thinking in with all the sex.

What do you do when you’re not writing smut? When you’re not writing smut, how much do you miss writing smut?

For now, I work as a server in a restaurant where a decent amount of the staff has read my book. So, basically, they know I’m a pervert, which is fine by me. I also write poetry and attempt to teach myself different skills on a revolving basis (CSS, Adobe InDesign, Photoshop, drawing, French, game-making).

When I’m not writing smut, I miss the response I get from writing smut. I think there’s something really honest and great about someone telling you that they read some erotica you wrote and it really got them going. There’s a certain amount of bullshit that you’ve skipped by just having that conversation. I miss that a lot when I stay away from smut for too long.

This is where you get to say something unforgettable. Have at it!

Dear person reading this,

If you didn’t know me before you read this interview, then hi, I’m Ben. I’m usually sketchy about strangers giving me advice, so I’ll understand if you brush off this next thing I’m about to say.

You are the best sexual partner you’re ever going to have, so be nice to yourself. Don’t beat yourself up about what turns you on. Don’t force yourself to fall in line with any narrow view of sexuality. Be nice to yourself.

Thanks for supporting Go Deeper press by reading our blog.  If you’d like to browse our erotic, sex-positive e-books for brain and brawn, you can find our website here.

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Meet Benji Bright, Part 1

BenjiBright

Mr. Benji Bright, Vectorized

I found Benji Bright doing what I usually do: poking around on the Internet when I should be doing other things. His new book, Candid, was featured on one of my favorite websites, Queer Young Cowboys, and since I’m a fan of indie publishing and most things queer, and completely smitten with the book’s trailer, I bought both a paper and e-copy.

Fast forward a couple days or so, and I knew this interview had to happen. I loved Benji’s voice in Candid and the way he writes sex, the way it turns me on in a different way. His word choice, scenarios, and descriptions, they’re sexy and slow, like the most tantalizing strip tease, and you keep reading because you want more. You keep reading because you want to see it all.

You can buy Candid right now right here. And don’t forget to drop by Benji’s blog at www.theeroticledger.com.

Do you remember the title of the first story you read that turned you on? Do you remember where you were and what you did next? (Oh, that might have sounded a little sleazy, right? But I swear it’s not meant to be!)

Benji: I think the first story that turned me on was a Christopher Pike book called Black Blood (Last Vampire, Book 2). There are some references to two characters being lovers and a post-coital scene, if I remember correctly.

I was totally entranced by that. Lovers. It seemed like the author included the reference for me personally. Afterward, I wrote a story of my own about a vampire woman and her lover fighting “Lodos Robots” sent from some anti-vampire source. It wasn’t very sexy, admittedly, and I got caught up in a subway fight scene that never worked out. I guess I learned early that writers are easily distracted creatures.

As to where I was? Probably hiding under a coffee table in my family first apartment. I was a weird kid.

I like to be open and honest and all that, so I think it’s important for people to know that you’re one of my new favorite writers. Do you remember the first person or people who said to you, “Benji, you seriously know how to write sex”?

First of all, thank you!

I started writing a novel in high school called A Future in Glass. I recently started rereading it, and I think it’s terrible, but it was my first attempt at writing a long story, something with gay characters and sex. I remember bringing it to my friends at school and vibrating in place while I waited for them to thumb through it. One of my friends declared, as soon as she’d finished it, that I should give her 5% (or was it 10%?) of all future novel earnings. Technically, I haven’t written a novel yet, so I think legally I don’t have to pay her.

But that was my first brush with erotic content, and I got the taste for it. One of the things I like about erotica is that the people who read it are vocal about it. They’re the kind of people who let you know when they’ve read something that’s got them hot. I love that. I like to be the one facilitating any sort of erotic discovery. It’s an amazing feeling.

Let me ask you this: Do you write alone, or do you have a community/group you work with for critique or what have you? Do you write every day?

Generally, I write alone, but I consider myself a product of the undergrad workshop atmosphere. I’m big on self-revision (what writer that consistently puts out work manages not to be?), and one of the best pieces of advice I’ve ever gotten from a writing instructor is to read your work aloud. It reveals things to you that you might not expect. I have one or two readers who I can rely on for feedback, but it can be surprisingly difficult to get my friends to critique my smut. Who knew?

I know there are places to go online, but I’ve been too lazy or too busy to explore that. As for writing daily, that’s my aspiration. But sometimes, in the words of Aimee Mann, “you paint a lovely picture, but reality intrudes.” On the days that I don’t write, I spend time actively planning what my next project will be. I have a spreadsheet where I keep track of my submissions, and I try to add to it diligently. Does that even remotely answer the question? I should be clear: I don’t write every day. I should, but even when I don’t, I’m planning to write. Somehow I get things done this way. Haha.

Who are some of your writing heroes?

Richard Siken for writing the book of poetry Crush, which totally changed how I felt poetry could discuss sexuality. Johnny Murdoc, who put Candid out under Queer Young Cowboys, but is also an amazing writer of dirty fiction. Joe Abercrombie, who has nothing to do with gay smut, but writes characters so full of flaws, contradictions, and surprising moments that you can’t help but admire his work. John Rechy whose Sexual Outlaws was probably the book that most inspired me to write erotica seriously. And, finally, Brian K. Vaughn (the writer) and Fiona Staples (the artist) who put together Saga, a comic series that is one of the most honest and fun things I’ve read in ages.

It’s a grab bag, I know.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of Benji’s interview. Trust me. You don’t want to miss them.

Thanks for supporting Go Deeper press by reading our blog.  If you’d like to browse our erotic, sex-positive e-books for brain and brawn, you can find our website here.

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“I Want to Hand a Copy to the Next Woman Who Thinks She Knows What Erotica is But Hasn’t a Clue…”

Available now from GDP!

Available now from GDP!

We’re always thrilled to receive reader reviews, especially when they’re as intelligent and glowing as Claudia McCoy’s.  (You can find her delightful and insightful Amazon reader review here.  Thank you so much, Claudia!).  And of course, as activists, we’re especially thrilled that Claudia wants to “hand a copy to the next woman who thinks she knows what erotica is but hasn’t a clue.”

Of course, we’re excited to hear what any of you think of the collection — or any of our books, for that matter.  So we’re offering you an incentive!  If you post a review on Amazon before the end of January 2013 (and of course, the review can be good, bad, or in between!) let us know who you are and we will email you a free Go Deeper e-book, with our thanks.  Claudia, of course, we’d like to email you your own free e-book.  So you, and other reviewers, can email us at “editors (at) godeeperpress.com.”

With feedback, we can work out what our readers really want.  And that, for us, is golden.  So thank you, Claudia, and thank you, all.

Buy Femme Fatale on Amazon here.

Buy Femme Fatale from Go Deeper Press here.

Don’t forget to join us on Twitter and Facebook for news, offers, and updates!  We look forward to it.

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Femme Fatale Erotic Reading: Some Other Time

Next, I have the privilege of reading from Some Other Time, Bracken MacLeod‘s contribution to Femme Fatale: Erotic Tales of Dangerous Women.  It’s a gorgeous, dark piece.  So enjoyable to read.  Have a listen…

You can buy Femme Fatale: Erotic Tales of Dangerous Women, edited by Lana Fox, here on Amazon OR here on B&N.

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Go Deeper Press at DigBoston

Big thanks to Emily Hopkins and all at DigBoston for a fabulous article on Go Deeper Press.  As you’ll see, we felt very comfortable when we met with Emily — comfortable enough to talk about our lives and loves.   In the interview, we express our excitement at our increasingly sex-positive society, our amazement that Fifty Shades should have garnered more interest than Anne Rice’s Sleeping Beauty trilogy, and our frustration that even large bookstores have zero/limited sections for erotica.  (You can bet your bottom dollar that the erotica is there, but it’s often the proverbial needle-haystack problem).  And that’s just for starters!

And by the way, we often don’t mention our personal blogs, but why not?  You can find Angela’s women’s soccer gossip here, and Lana’s sex blog here.  We’re always delighted to welcome you!

Anyway, have a lovely, sex-positive Tuesday, folks.  We heart you.

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